NEWS FROM THE ART & DESIGN WORLD
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NEWS FROM THE ART & DESIGN WORLD

A WEEKLY CURATED SELECTION OF WEEKLY NEWS FROM ARCHITECTS, DESIGNERS & ARTISTS WORLDWIDE:

Every week, we collate information from press releases and articles across the worldwide web in order to give you a curated selection of hot news from the wonderful world of art, design and architecture. Scroll down and find out more about what’s been happening this week.

ZAHA HADID ARCHITECTS PUBLISH AN OPEN LETTER AGAINST DIRECTOR PATRIK SCHUMACHER’S INCENDIARY STATEMENT:

Following Patrik Schumacher’s call for social housing and public space to be scrapped during his speech at the World Architecture Festival in Berlin in November, Zaha Hadid’s friends and family have disowned the ZHA’s Director’s statement through a heartfelt open letter.

Rana Hadid, Peter Palumbo and Brian Clarke – trustees of the Zaha Hadid Foundation and executors of the late Ms Hadid’s estate, said that they completely disagree with Mr Schumacher’s views, claiming that Ms Hadid herself would have opposed the speech as it pushed for a deregulated and privatised city – the complete opposite of ZHA’s portfolio and ethos. (Source: Dezeen)

Zaha Hadid (Photo Credit: Christopher Pillitz/Getty Images)

Zaha Hadid (Photo Credit: Christopher Pillitz/Getty Images)

CHRIS LEVINE FEATURED IN EXHIBITION BY ART BASTION GALERY DURING CONTEXT ART MIAMI:

Running from 29th November until 4th December this year, CONTEXT Art Miami is one of the key contemporary art events taking place in the United States. Dedicated to established and emerging artists and galleries of 21st century art, CONTEXT Art Miami is hosting the city’s own Art Bastion Gallery among its exhibitors.

Featured in the gallery’s ‘The Truth About Lies’ exhibition is Britain’s eminent light artist Chris Levine, famous for his immersive iy_project light installations and his iconic portraits of Queen Elizabeth, Kate Moss and Grace Jones, among others. Levine’s ‘Equanimous’ portrait of the Queen has been selected as part of the Art Bastion Gallery, so if you’re visiting the event, don’t miss out on the unique opportunity of viewing one of Levine’s most beautiful works up-close. (Source: Chris Levine/TwelveArts)

Chris Levine, Equanimous (Image Courtesy of the Artist and TwelveArts)

Chris Levine, Equanimous (Image Courtesy of the Artist and TwelveArts)

ELONGATED CABINS BY KAMVARI ARCHITECTS TO BE BUILT ALONG TRANS-SIBERIAN RAILWAY:

Kamvari Architects has won a contest to design pit stops along the world’s longest railway line, by proposing a series of wooden cabins that look like elephants’ trunks.

The London-based studio won first prize in the competition calling for customer facilities at points along the Trans-Siberian Railway, a 9,289-kilometre route that connects Moscow with the Russian Far East. (Source: Dezeen)

Rendering of the proposed pit stops along the Trans-Siberian Railway by Kamvari Architects (Image Credit: Kamvari Architects)

Rendering of the proposed pit stops along the Trans-Siberian Railway by Kamvari Architects (Image Credit: Kamvari Architects)

SCIENCE MUSEUM UNVEILS THE WINTON GALLERY DESIGNED BY ZAHA HADID ARCHITECTS:

Mathematics: The Winton Gallery tells the story of how mathematics has shaped our world and is set to open on 8th December at London’s Science Museum. Designed by the world-renowned Zaha Hadid Architects, this outstanding new gallery spans 400 years of human ingenuity and brings mathematical history to life through the design and architecture of its displays.

Conceived as a wind tunnel for the largest object in the gallery – a Handley Page aircraft from 1929 – the space follows the lines of airflow around it in a stunning display of imagined aerodynamics. Other objects in the gallery range from intriguing hand-held mathematical instruments to 19th-century human skulls, covering a time-span from the Renaissance to the present day. (Source: The Science Museum)

The Winton Gallery at the Science Museum, designed by Zaha Hadid Architects (Photo Credit: Zaha Hadid Architects/The Science Museum)

The Winton Gallery at the Science Museum, designed by Zaha Hadid Architects (Photo Credit: Zaha Hadid Architects/The Science Museum)

AUDEMARS PIGUET’S ROYAL OAK GETS THE FLORENTINE FINISH:

It was a match made in Florence. When Audemars Piguet wanted to mark the 40th anniversary of the women’s Royal Oak, they turned to Italian jewellery designer – and dedicated Royal Oak wearer – Carolina Bucci.

Known for her everyday approach to fine jewellery and precious coloured stones, London-based Bucci is the fourth-generation of a traditional Florentine family jeweller. Her pieces are crafted at the family workshops in the Italian city of Florence. It’s also where she developed her other key design signature, a gold technique known as the ‘Florentine finish’. (Read more: Wallpaper*)

The Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Frosted Gold, left, created in collaboration with Florentine jewellery designer Carolina Bucci, right (Photo Credit: Audemars Piguet/Carolina Bucci)

The Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Frosted Gold, left, created in collaboration with Florentine jewellery designer Carolina Bucci, right (Photo Credit: Audemars Piguet/Carolina Bucci)

THE OBAMAS JUST BOUGHT A HOUSE IN CALIFORNIA:

Back in May we obsessed over the D.C. mansion where the Obamas will move after they leave the White House, and now it sounds like the family plans to be bicoastal. The New York Post reports that the President has purchased a second home in Rancho Mirage, just outside of Palm Springs. There are a few obvious reasons for the choice. President Obama loves golf, and there is tons of golf in Rancho Mirage.

It’s also the home of Sunnylands, a.k.a. the West Coast version of Camp David, meaning the family has probably spent tons of time near their new residence and decided it was a good new place to settle down. The Post also reports that the First Family is also buying a “holiday getaway” in Obama’s childhood home of Hawaii. (Source: Architectural Digest)

The Obama’s D.C. Mansion (Photo Credit: Celebuzz)

The Obama’s D.C. Mansion (Photo Credit: Celebuzz)

SHIP-LIKE HEADQUARTERS FOR CALVIN KLEIN AND TOMMY HILFIGER OVERLOOKS AMSTERDAM’S IJ RIVER:

MVSA Architects were inspired by superyachts when creating the European headquarters for fashion brands Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger on the banks of Amsterdam’s IJ river. The new European headquarters for PVH Europe, which owns Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger, features 12 storeys of offices and showrooms for its various American brands.

Wanting the building to have a commanding presence, local firm MVSA Architects obtained permission to build at nearly double the permitted 21.5-metre height restriction in the area. At a height of 50 metres, the headquarters towers above its neighbours. (Source: Dezeen)

New Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger HQ in Amsterdam by MVSA Architects (Photo Credit: Ronald Tilleman)

New Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger HQ in Amsterdam by MVSA Architects (Photo Credit: Ronald Tilleman)

 

DAX SAVAGE’S WITCHY WORKS EMBRACE THE NATURAL WORLD, RELIGION AND THE AMERICAN WEST:

In Los Angeles – a city of shape-shifters and perpetual reinvention – some of the biggest discoveries are hiding in plain sight. Siglo Moderno, Jorge Luis Cruzata’s singular design gallery and showroom, is no exception.

The new gallery space’s inaugural exhibition is devoted to the work of Dax Savage, known primarily as a jewellery designer and fine artist. It was, as Cruzata explains ‘the perfect union’, a witchy brew of art and design that perfectly complemented the church’s original architecture, particularly its Empyrean altar. (Source: Wallpaper*)

Detail of ‘B4’, 2016, moose horn, reed and black Danish wood, pulp rope (Photo Credit: Dax Savage/SigloModerno)

Detail of ‘B4’, 2016, moose horn, reed and black Danish wood, pulp rope (Photo Credit: Dax Savage/Siglo Moderno)

 

A LOOK INTO THE NEW YORK CITY THAT WAS NEVER BUILT:

It’s almost impossible to imagine New York City without such landmarks as Central Park. Yet, were it not for a mid-19th-century bill enacted by the state legislature calling for more than 750 acres to be allocated for the grounds, New Yorkers would’ve never been able to experience the spoils of the iconic park. But what about other would-be landmarks that, for reasons political or other, were never realized in New York City?

The new book Never Built New York (Metropolis Books, 2016) explores that very topic. Included in this tome are unbuilt projects such as a beautiful Park Avenue skyscraper by Zaha Hadid; a design for Brooklyn’s Dodger Stadium that featured a giant dome to shield players and fans from the rain; an airport perched on steel columns 200 feet above street level, spanning from 24th to 71st Street and Ninth Avenue to the Hudson River; and many others. (Source: Architectural Digest)

The ‘Never Built New York’ book cover, featuring Zaha Hadid’s design for a skyscraper on 425 Park Avenue, one of several entries in a 2012 competition eventually won by Foster + Partners (Photo Credit: Greg Goldin/Sam Lubell/Zaha Hadid)

The ‘Never Built New York’ book cover, featuring Zaha Hadid’s design for a skyscraper on 425 Park Avenue, one of several entries in a 2012 competition eventually won by Foster + Partners (Photo Credit: Greg Goldin/Sam Lubell/Zaha Hadid)

 

THE WORLDS OF SCIENCE, DESIGN AND RAVE CULTURE COLLIDE IN PETER SAVILLE’S GLASSWARE:

Peter Saville’s new glassware for the Museum of Science and Industry (MSI) is a nod to not only Manchester’s part in the industrial revolution, but also to its role in the postmodern cultural overhaul enacted by punk and rave. Styled after laboratory flasks, each of Saville’s three vases has his diagonal warning stripes design etched across it, a symbol he originally re-appropriated for Factory Records when he co-founded it in 1979.

This graphic sampling of hazard stripes for Factory (which was hand-drawn; this was pre-web) was a way of reclaiming Manchester’s industrial identity, which by the 1970s had become associated with unemployment and the past. The stripes appeared across the label’s record sleeves and promo material, and designer Ben Kelly incorporated them into his interior scheme at the Haçienda, most famously on the floor. (Source: Wallpaper*)

Peter Saville’s new glassware collection for the Museum of Science & Industry, Manchester (Photo Credit: Peter Saville)

Peter Saville’s new glassware collection for the Museum of Science & Industry, Manchester (Photo Credit: Peter Saville)

BIG AND BARCODE ARCHITECTS UNVEIL TERRACED BLOCK FOR IJBURG WATERFRONT:

Bjarke Ingels Group and Barcode Architects have revealed their competition-winning design for an Amsterdam tower, which will terrace down to touch the surface of the IJriver. The 46,000-square-metre mixed-use building named Sluishuis is designed as a gateway to Amsterdam’s IJburg, a neighbourhood set on artificial islands that float on IJ.

Created by Bjarke Ingel‘s Copenhagen-based firm BIG and Rotterdam studio Barcode Architects, it features two chamfered corners that stretch down to the jetty or water to open up a courtyard in the centre. These sloping elements – not dissimilar to those found in BIG’s 8 House in Copenhagen and VIA 57 West “courtscraper” in New York – are intended to allow residents to scale the roof and enjoy views over the city. (Source: Dezeen)

the-sluishuis-building-for-amsterdams-ijburg-neighbourhood-by-bjarkeingelss-big-and-barcode-architects

The Sluishuis building for Amsterdam’s IJburg neighbourhood, by BjarkeIngels’s BIG and Barcode Architects (Image Credit: BIG/Barcode Architects)

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