News from the art & design world
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NEWS FROM THE ART & DESIGN WORLD

A WEEKLY CURATED SELECTION OF NEWS FROM ARCHITECTS, DESIGNERS & ARTISTS WORLDWIDE:

Every week, we collate information from press releases and articles across the worldwide web in order to give you a curated selection of hot news from the wonderful world of art, design and architecture. Scroll down and find out more about what’s been happening this week.

VICTOR CASTANERA DESIGNS BALANCING LAMP MADE UP OF MONOCHROME SPHERES:

The LED lamp, which will be launched at this month’s edition of Maison & Objet in Paris, features glowing glass orbs that balance between steel shelves. The Balance lamp was designed by Victor Castanera for young Swedish brand Oblure. It is made up of a number of spherical components, sized to achieve a “perfect balance”. (Read the full article: Dezeen)

Victor Castanera’s Balance lamp for Oblure (Image Courtesy: Victor Castanera / Oblure)

SOAP STAR – GRADUATE SEUNGBIN YANG RAISES THE BAR:

It’s the time of the year when we celebrate new talent, scouring schools for the best graduate projects. We kick off with the work of Design Eindhoven graduate Seungbin Yang, who has raised the bar with this sculptural soap.

Inspired by Iceland’s dramatic landscapes, ‘PantaRhei’ (meaning ‘everything flows’) is designed to reflect nature’s flowing forms. Made from soap foam and set on a stage of brass, marble and wood, the sculpture’s form develops and fades over time with use. (Read the full article: Wallpaper*)

PantaRhei soap and shelf by Studio Seungbin Yang (Image Courtesy: Baker & Evans)

CHLOË SEVIGNY SELLS HER BROOKLYN HOME FOR $2.75 MILLION:

Chloë Sevigny is the poster girl for quirky, off-the-beaten-path style, so it might surprise you to hear that she owned this fabulous pre-war Park Slope co-op, with interiors that are classically beautiful. However, the indie actress decided to part ways with the Brooklyn home; the co-op just sold for $2.75 million, reports StreetEasy.

The interiors are a bit more monochromatic than you might expect, featuring three bedrooms, three bathrooms, and a refined aesthetic. The 2,100-square-foot second-floor unit also includes a gallery space with black-and-white tile flooring (a motif that can be seen throughout), a cosy pantry that includes built-ins and a desk, and a large living room with views of Prospect Park. (Read the full article: Architectural Digest)

Inside Chloë Sevigny’s Brooklyn home (Image Courtesy: Cocoran.com)

MX_SI AND MESTRES WÅGE ARQUITECTES TO TRANSFORM 1930’S SILO INTO ART GALLERY IN NORWAY:

Barcelona-based studios MX_SI and MestresWågeArquitectes have won a competition to covert a 1930s silo into an art museum and cultural centre in Norway. The Kunstsilo contest called for proposals to transform the Odderøya grain silo, which was built in 1935 on the wharf Silokaia in Kristiansand – a city in the southern county of Vest-Agder. It stands next to the Kilden Performing Arts Centre designed by ALA Architects.

MX_SI and MestresWågeArquitectes’ winning scheme was chosen for the quality of exhibition spaces but also for its respect of the historical silo – one of the first in Norway to be constructed with cylindrical cells made of reinforced concrete. (Read the full article: Dezeen)

A rendering of the Kunstsilo in Norway by MX_SI and MestresWågeArquitectes (Image Courtesy: MX_SI /MestresWågeArquitectes)

COLOUR BLOCK – ROGERS STIRK HARBOUR + PARTNERS COMPLETES INTERNATIONAL TOWERS IN SYDNEY:

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners has completed the final tower of the International Towers in Sydney, marking the culmination of the first major part of its masterplan for the Barangaroo South area which unites the CBD with the waterfront.

Looking out over Sydney’s western harbour, the facades of the three International Towers are covered with colourful fins designed to deflect heat while allowing light to enter. While visually cohesive as a trio, each tower is unique, reacting to its orientation. (Read the full article: Wallpaper*)

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners’ International Towers look out over Sydney’s harbour (Image Courtesy: Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners)

DAVID ADJAYE IS RECEIVING A KNIGHTHOOD FROM THE QUEEN:

The year 2016 was quite a standout for British-Ghanaian architect David Adjaye. For starters, his design for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History & Culture opened to the highest possible acclaim in Washington, D.C. Following this came a slew of important commissions like Latvia’s first-ever contemporary art museum and a short list mention for the U.K.’s National Holocaust Museum.

But perhaps the icing on the proverbial cake of Adjaye’s 2016 came at the last possible moment, when the architect was named Knight Bachelor in Queen Elizabeth II’s annual New Year’s Honours. (Read the full article: Architectural Digest)

Moscow School of Management by Adjaye Associates (Image Courtesy: Adjaye Associates)

CONCAVE ROOFS COLLECT RAINWATER FOR ARID AREAS IN PROPOSAL BY BMDESIGN STUDIOS:

Bowl-shaped vessels would collect rainwater on the roofs of buildings located in hot and dry climates in a proposal by Iranian practice BMDesign Studios. Tehran-based BMDesign Studios – one of many offices contributing to Iran’s booming architecture scene – drew up the concept when planning a primary school in Iran’s Kerman province.

Taking into consideration the arid climate of its site in the city of Jiroft, the architects set about devising a way to offset the building’s water consumption. (Read the full story: Dezeen)

Proposal by BMDesign Studios with concave roofs for a primary school in Iran’s Kerman province (Image Courtesy: BMDesign)

SOLID STATE – RICK OWENS’ LATEST FORAY INTO SCULPTURE AND FURNITURE:

He’s a favourite of rappers and the man who invented ‘grunge-luxe’, but California-born, Paris-based Rick Owens is less well-known for his connections to brutalist architecture, minimalist furniture design and modernist painting. But a new exhibition at the LA Museum of Contemporary Art’s Pacific Design Centre reveals Owens’ engagement with these related disciplines.

Organised by MoCA curatorial assistant Rebecca Matalon, in close collaboration with Owens’ wife and creative partner Michèle Lamy, ‘Rick Owens: Furniture’ presents pieces from the line created by the couple in 2007, alongside a group of large-scale sculptures, many being seen in public for the first time. (Read the full article: Wallpaper*)

Installation view of MoCA’s recently opened exhibition, presenting furniture, video and new large-scale sculptures by Rick Owens (Image Courtesy:Owenscorp)

JOHN BERGER, PROVOCATIVE ART CRITIC, DIES AT 90:

John Berger, the British critic, novelist and screenwriter whose groundbreaking 1972 television series and book, “Ways of Seeing”, declared war on traditional ways of thinking about art and influenced a generation of artists and teachers, died on Monday at his home in the Paris suburb of Antony. He was 90.

Simon McBurney, the British actor and a friend of Mr. Berger’s, confirmed his death to The Associated Press. (Read the full article: New York Times)

John Berger during a rehearsal of “Lying Down to Sleep’” at the Prado Museum in Madrid in 2010. (Image Courtesy: Emilio Naranjo / European Pressphoto Agency)

BRIGHT LIGHTS FOR THE BIENNALE DES ANTIQUAIRES:

Taiwanese jewellery designer Cindy Chao didn’t want the standard booth for the upcoming 28th Biennale des Antiquaires in Paris, so she partnered up with New York artist Grimanesa Amorós to create the installation design for her stand there. Amorós sought out to bring Chao’s jewellery to life through a custom LED lighting sequence.

‘This will make us feel we are inside of a natural environment; almost “breathing”, bringing out the life force present in each gemstone of Cindy’s jewellery,’ said Amorós. (Read the full article: Wallpaper*)

Installation by GrimanesaAmorós (Image Courtesy: GrimanesaAmorós)

DAMAGED BY WAR, SYRIA’S CULTURAL SITES RISE ANEW IN FRANCE:

When the Islamic State was about to be driven out of the ancient city of Palmyra in March, Yves Ubelmann got a call from Syria’s director of antiquities to come over in a hurry.

An architect by training, Mr. Ubelmann, 36, had worked in Syria before the country was engulfed by war. But now there was special urgency for the kind of work his youthful team of architects, mathematicians and designers did from their cramped offices in Paris: producing digital copies of threatened historical sites. (Read the full article: New York Times)

“Eternal Sites: From Bamiyan to Palmyra,” an exhibition that calls attention to the rising threats to global heritage, has attracted large crowds to the Grand Palais in Paris (Image Courtesy: Dmitry Kostyukov for The New York Times)

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