ART REVOLUTIONARIES AT MAYORAL LONDON 
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ART REVOLUTIONARIES AT MAYORAL LONDON 

PICASSO, MIRÓ & CALDER RESPOND TO SPANISH CIVIL WAR IN 1937 IN A CURATED LONDON SHOW BY MAYORAL:

Mayoral will hold an exhibition inspired by the Spanish Pavilion at the 1937 Paris Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne, commemorating 80 years since its inauguration. It will take place from 18th January until 10th February at 6 Duke Street, St James’s, London SW1 6BN.

The original Pavilion marked a crucial moment during the Spanish Civil War (17 July 1936 – 1 April 1939), with the Spanish Republic using it as a platform to demonstrate to the rest of the world the atrocities that were taking place in Spain.

Joan Miró, El Segador (The Reaper), 1937, oil on celotex, 550 x 365cm, disappeared. Arxiu Históric del Col.legi Oficial d’Arquitectes de Catalunya (Photo Credit: Roness-Ruan /© Successió Miró, 2016)

Similarly to the original pavilion, this exhibition features paintings and sculptures by modernist masters including Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, Alexander Calder and Julio González. This London event also brings together important archival material, such as rare propaganda posters from the original pavilion and a replica of Miró’s infamous work El Segador(The Reaper) which disappeared when the pavilion was dismantled in 1937.

Joan Miró, Métamorphose, 1936, Pencil, India ink, wash, decal and watercolour on paper, 48.3×63.8cm (Image Courtesy: Mayoral)

Mayoral’s tribute to the Pavilion is curated by Juan Manuel Bonet, Director of the Instituto Cervantes in Paris, and former Director of Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in Madrid. The exhibition is produced in collaboration with Joan Punyet Miró, historian and grandson of Joan Miró and specialists on the subject, Fernando Martin and Josefina Alix.

 

Alexander Calder, Crag with Yellow Boomerang and Red Eggplant, 1974, Láminas de metal pintado y alambre, 198.1 x 238.7 x 104.1cm (Image Courtesy: Mayoral)

Amongst the works featured will be Picasso’s Head of a Woman, Calder’s sculpture Crag with Yellow Boomerang and Red Eggplant and Miró’s  Métamorphose.

The Spanish government sought to use the Pavilion as a means of political propaganda, to reveal the cruelty of Franco’s regime. Participation in the Paris Exposition became an occasion to reflect on the conflict, with the Spanish Government commissioning some of the key artists and designers in the country at that time.

 

Ramón Puyol, ¡No Pasarán! Julio 1936; Julio 1937, ¡Pasaremos! – Posters Collection of the Pavilion of the Spanish Republic (University of Barcelona); C-432; F-432, © Autors (Image Courtesy: CRAI Biblioteca del Pavelló de la República, Barcelona)

The commission stimulated the artists to create some of the most significant artworks of their careers: Picasso’s Guernica, Calder’s The Mercury Fountain, González’s Montserrat and Miró’s El Segador(The Reaper).
(Source: Mayoral)

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