#InTheNews: The Latest from Architects, Designers and Artists Worldwide
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#InTheNews: The Latest from Architects, Designers and Artists Worldwide

The Latest from Architects, Designers and Artists Worldwide

Foster+Partners’ Apple Campus 2 takes shape in new drone movie: The unofficial drone video captures the construction of Foster+PartnersApple headquarters in Cupertino, California, as the outer shell of the campus nears completion. Former Apple CEO Steve Jobs asked Norman Foster to design Apple’s headquarters via a personal phone call six years ago. “For me, this project started in the summer of 2009,” said Foster in a movie by Cupertino City Council. On Wednesday Apple released its hotly anticipated iPhone 7, as well as an Apple Watch designed from swimmers and wireless headphones. (Source: Dezeen)

Apple Campus 2 (Photo Credit: Dezeen)

Apple Campus 2 (Photo Credit: Dezeen)

An 1884 Upper West Side townhouse built by Clarence True is now on the market: Located on West 87th Street, just one block from Central Park, it has six floors of living space, all elevator-accessible. On the first floor is a Jacobean-style foyer with oak flooring featuring original parquet design work, oak wainscoting, and intricate

On the first floor is a Jacobean-style foyer with oak flooring featuring original parquet design work, oak wainscoting, and intricate mill work. The third floor houses the master suite, which has a study with a fireplace, a marble-clad bath with a claw-foot tub, and a balcony in the main bedroom area. The upper floors include four additional bedrooms, as well as a fifth-floor balcony spanning the width of the building, and a rooftop terrace. The living room showcases Rococo-style coved plaster ceilings, while original oak stairs and herringbone wood floors add exquisite detail. This superb property was built in 1884 by prominent New York architect

This superb property was built in 1884 by prominent New York architect Clarence True and renovated by Zivkovik Connolly Architects to reflect its original detailing. It’s listed for $11.5M and spans 6,414 sq. ft. over 5 bedrooms and 8 bathrooms. (Source: Architectural Digest)

 

Living room detail, 1884 Clarence True NY townhouse (Photo Credit: Nest Seekers)

Living room detail, 1884 Clarence True NY townhouse (Photo Credit: Nest Seekers)

Nicholas Serota to step down as director of Tate galleries: Nicholas Serota, who was responsible for the launch of the Herzog & de Meuron-designed Tate Modern and its recent Switch House extension, is stepping down as director of the Tate organisation after 28 years. Tate, which spans the huge

Tate, which spans the huge Tate Modern gallery and Tate Britain in London, as well as Tate St. Ives and Tate Liverpool, is currently recruiting for his replacement. Serota is a vocal champion of the creative industries and one of the UK’s leading arts figures, as well as a patron of architecture and design. (Source: Dezeen)

Nicholas Serota (Photo Credit: Hugo Glendinning)

Nicholas Serota (Photo Credit: Hugo Glendinning)

Inside Chanel’s pop-up Parisian apartment at Bergdorf Goodman: There are some things all design lovers can appreciate – a Yves Behar cocktail table, a stunning white fireplace, a perfectly designed bookcase, jaw-dropping chandeliers and, of course, Chanel fine jewellery. Now you can see all of this and more at Chanel’s new Parisian apartment pop-up at Bergdorf Goodman’s in New York.

The glamorous space was designed by Peter Marino, fashion’s favourite architect, and features Chanel’s iconic black, white and gold palette. The French fashion house is no stranger to creating fanciful locales for its designs; under creative director Karl Lagerfeld, Chanel shows have become an experiential performance of sorts, with recent sets including a grocery store, a café and an airport. Bergdorf Goodman is also debuting a new look, as the store reopened its freshly renovated main floor earlier this week.

The pop-up apartment, designed to mimic a high-end home, launched on 7th September and is open through 11th September. (Source: Architectural Digest)

Chanel pop-up Parisian apartment at Bergdorf Goodman, New York (Photo Credit: Chanel)

Chanel pop-up Parisian apartment at Bergdorf Goodman, New York (Photo Credit: Chanel)

Asif Khan and MINI to install “forests” across East London for London Design Festival: London architect Asif Khan will install three plant-filled rooms across Shoreditch for this year’s London Design Festival.

Khan’s Forests installation for MINI Living is intended to create spaces for people to meet up on their way to and from work. The MINI installation features three themed rooms named Connect, Create and Relax – all located in busy areas in Shore ditch.

The MINI Living Forests is open to the public during the London Design Festival, which takes place from 17th to 25th September 2016. Khan’s other projects include an installation in Melbourne’s Federation Square and an elevated wooden play area at an East London primary school. (Source: Dezeen)

Asif Khan + MINI Living, Forests installation for LDF (Photo Credit: Dezeen)

Asif Khan + MINI Living, Forests installation for LDF (Photo Credit: Dezeen)

Magic Mats – José Lévy transforms Japanese tatami for Daiken at Maison & Objet: In the wide spectrum of innovative materials available to designers, it’s the challenging ones that create the most intrigue. For a new cross-cultural collaboration, French designer José Lévy has taken traditional rice straw tatami and created a new selection of furniture for Japanese manufacturers Daiken.

Launched at Maison & Objet this month, the sensual collection is titled ‘Moving Tatamis’ and embraces the material’s heritage as traditional Japanese flooring. Being the first ever furniture collection to be made out of this material meant some tweaking. The structures were woven from traditional Japanese washi paper instead of straw, to solidify and add resistance to the material, while retaining the desirable lightweight quality. (Source: Wallpaper)

Moving Tatamis for Daiken by JoséLévy (Photo Credit: Daiken)

Moving Tatamis for Daiken by José Lévy (Photo Credit: Daiken)

How the fight for a national African-American museum was won: The idea of a national African-American museum had been hatched more than a century ago by black Civil War veterans. Eleven years ago, there was no land, no building, not even a collection. The legislation that created the African-American museum after a long racially charged congressional battle authorised the government to pay for only half. It took over a decade of strategic appointments on the museum’s board (i.e. Laura Bush and Colin Powell to broaden bipartisan support), books published, support from IBM for the official project’s website and staged exhibitions at the National Museum of American History for the museum to finally get its physical form.

In less than three weeks, though, with President Obama presiding, the new Museum of African American History – a project that once thirsted for money, land and political support, is scheduled to open on the National Mall near the Washington Monument. The museum’s team collected artefacts from around the nation for the “Save Our African American Treasures” 15-city program that ultimately helped the project get its subsequent funding; 3,000 of the 40,000 objects collected will be exhibited at the grand opening. (Source: The New York Times)

Laura Bush, centre, the former First Lady, helped lend the Museum of African American History the much needed bipartisan support (Photo Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Laura Bush, centre, the former First Lady, helped lend the Museum of African American History the much needed bipartisan support (Photo Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Lincoln Plaza named Britain’s worst new building in Carbuncle Cup 2016: A tower block has been named the worst new building in the UK, after being described as “an open invitation to commit suicide”.

The Lincoln Plaza housing tower in East London by BUJ Architects has been awarded the Carbuncle Cup 2016 by architecture website BD. Featuring geometric cladding, projecting glass balconies and a so-called sky lounge, the residential complex was intended by developer Galliard as a striking new landmark to stand alongside the towers of Canary Wharf.

The Carbuncle Cup is intended as a counterbalance to the Stirling Prize, which is awarded by the Royal Institute of British Architects each year to recognise an outstanding new building. Last year’s Carbuncle Cup was won by Rafael Viñoly’s Walkie Talkie skyscraper in London, which was described as a “gratuitous glass gargoyle graffitied onto the skyline of London”. (Source: Dezeen)

Lincoln Plaza, London (Photo Credit: Ike Ijeh)

Lincoln Plaza, London (Photo Credit: Ike Ijeh)

Utopia by Design, a look at the inaugural London Design Biennale pavilions: the first edition of the London Design Biennale has taken over Somerset House this September, presenting newly commissioned installations and works by contemporary designers, innovative concepts and research-led design.

Focusing on the theme of ‘Utopia by Design’, 37 countries were invited to ponder issues such as sustainability, urbanism, migration and pollution, on the occasion of the 500th anniversary of Thomas More’s Utopia.

Designers and curators developed different definitions of utopia, asking questions whose answers imagine different futures inspired by current situations and issues.

Among the highlights will be Forecast, by Barber & Ogersby and supported by British Land; VR Polis, Diving into the Future by Dimeloami Productions and curated by Maite Cantón; Chakraview by Sumant Jayakrishnan; and Border City by FR-EE (Fernando Romero Enterprise, Mexico), to name but a few. (Source: Wallpaper)

VR Polis, Diving into the Future by Dimeolami Productions for London Design Biennale, Somerset House (Photo Credit: Wallpaper)

VR Polis, Diving into the Future by Dimeolami Productions for London Design Biennale, Somerset House (Photo Credit: Wallpaper)

Arts Center at Ground Zero has a new design, and Barba Streisand in charge: Long-delayed plans to build a performing arts centre at the World Trade Center site moved forward on Thursday when officials unveiled a new design for the building and announced that Barbra Streisand had been elected chairwoman of the board.

A performing arts centre was an important feature of the architect Daniel Libeskind’s 2003 master plan for the site’s redevelopment, but that element languished, becoming one of the last big pieces of unfinished business in rebuilding the World Trade Center after the attacks of 11th September, 2001. The project was revived in June this year with a $75M donation from Ronald O. Perelman, the billionaire businessman.

Now, just before the 15th anniversary of the attacks, plans for the Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center at the World Trade Center are taking new shape. The New York architecture firm REX was selected after a more elaborate plan by Frank Gehry was shelved, and its team has released the conceptual design – three small theatres that can be combined in various configurations to produce and stage theatre, dance, music, opera and experimental works, and can serve as a space for the Tribeca Film Festival each spring. (Source: The New York Times)

A rendering of the Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center at the World Trade Center (Photo Credit: Luxigon)

A rendering of the Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center at the World Trade Center (Photo Credit: Luxigon)

 

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