#InTheNews: The Latest from Architects, Designers and Artists Worldwide
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#InTheNews: The Latest from Architects, Designers and Artists Worldwide

YOUR WEEKLY CURATED SELECTION OF INDUSTRY NEWS:

Fender’s rooftop music custom shop in Mexico City offers a myriad of sensations in a highly versatile space:Fender collaborated with Arquitectura en Movimiento for its first store in Mexico. The basic concept behind it was focused on an architecture conceived as highly versatile, a hybrid space that could function equally as a store, an art gallery and a lounge. In a combination of great music and the notion of the guitar as an anthropometric measure unit, the vivid space now offers a plethora of interesting experiences in one functional space. The exterior integrates timber and stone, framed by an arc of vegetation that directs the eye towards the city vistas, while the interior immerses visitors into the Fender spirit. (Source: HouSublime)

Fender store, Mexico City (Photo Credit: Fender/Arquitectura en Movimiento)

Fender store, Mexico City (Photo Credit: Fender/Arquitectura en Movimiento)

Francesco Jodice photography exhibition at Gazelli Art House, London:Multi-award-winning artist and photographer Francesco Jodice will hold his first UK solo exhibition at Gazelli Art Housefrom 18th November 2016 until 8th January 2017. Following his solo museum retrospective at CAMERA – Centro Italiano per la Fotografia, Cabaret Voltaire will highlight four separate bodies of work, all of which encompass participation, networking, anthropometry, storytelling and investigation. Each of these series studies particular regions or precise moments in our recent history, with an aim to answer the artist’s social and cultural questions and contemporary geopolitical scenario. Jodice is intrigued by what is about to happen, what paradoxically has already happened: the emergence of a new phenomenon in culture is the aftereffect of something that we have, more or less consciously, premeditated. (Source: Gazelli Art House)

Francesco Jodice, Capri, The Diefenbach Chronicles 003, 2013 – detail (Courtesy of the Artist)

Francesco Jodice, Capri, The Diefenbach Chronicles 003, 2013 – detail (Courtesy of the Artist)

CHROFI wins conservatory contest for Australian botanical gardens:Sydney studio CHROFI has won a competition to create a new conservatory at the Australian National Botanic Gardens in Canberra, with plans for a raised cube dressed in curtain-like glazing. The Ian Potter National Conservatory contest called for a centre to both display and conserve rare and threatened tropical plants. CHROFI won the competition with its proposal to create a conservatory raised above the ground, and wrapped in layers of transparent and translucent glass to offer an ideal tropical environment. (Source: Dezeen)

Studio rendering of the Ian Potter National Conservatory by CHROFI (Image Credit: CHROFI)

Studio rendering of the Ian Potter National Conservatory by CHROFI (Image Credit: CHROFI)

Caran d’Ache and MB&F collaborate on a cosmic fountain pen:Geneva watch brand MB&F continues its obsession with old school sci-fi in a witty new collaboration with Caran d’Ache, the Swiss writing instrument manufacturer. The Astrograph is a limited-edition pen design rooted in old-fashioned childhood fantasies of the Space Race, designed to highlight the mechanical skills central to the processes of both high-watchmaking and pen design. It is completely manufactured in the Caran d’Ache workshops – sleek and unmarked by rivets or external pipework like actual projectiles, the Astrograph’s fluid design features a chequered pattern, enriched with anthracite lacquer, a Caran d’Ache speciality. (Source: Wallpaper*)

The Astrograph, by MB&F and Carand’Ache (Photo Credit: MB&F/Carand’Ache)

The Astrograph, by MB&F and Caran d’Ache (Photo Credit: MB&F/Caran d’Ache)

102 Latin American artworks, and a new Institute, will go to MoMA: Before Lygia Clark was getting major museum retrospectives; before Adriana Varejão was represented by leading galleries; before Beatriz Milhazes was achieving high prices at auction, Patricia Phelps de Cisneros was collecting Latin American art, filling the walls of her home with Modernist abstraction and contemporary works by artists from Brazil, Venezuela, Argentina and Uruguay.Over the last 16 years, Ms. Cisneros and her husband, Gustavo A. Cisneros, have donated 40 of these pieces to the Museum of Modern Art, where she has served on the board since 1992. Now, they are giving 102 more and establishing a research institute at the museum for the study of Latin American art.

The donation includes artists who were working on abstraction during the middle and second half of the 20th century, such as Hélio Oiticica, Lygia Pape, Jesús Rafael Soto and Tomás Maldonado. Of the 37 artists whose works are included in the most recent gift, 21 are entering MoMA’s collection for the first time. (Source: The New York Times)

Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, and Glenn D. Lowry, Director of MoMA, in front of Alejandro Otero’s ‘Pampatar Board, 1954’ (Photo Credit: Benjamin Norman/New York Times)

Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, and Glenn D. Lowry, Director of MoMA, in front of Alejandro Otero’s ‘Pampatar Board, 1954’ (Photo Credit: Benjamin Norman/New York Times)

OMA, MAD and Studio Gang compete for Tour Montparnasse redesign: OMA, MAD and Studio Gang are among seven teams vying to overhaul Paris’Tour Montparnasse – a 209-metre tower that caused such uproar on completion that it sparked a 42-year skyscraper ban in the city.French practices Dominique Perrault Architecture and Architecture Studio, and UK firm PLP Architecture are also included in the shortlist for the competition, which will see the façade and interior of the controversial tower completely redesigned.Tour Montparnasse was designed by architects Eugène Beaudouin, Urbain Cassan and Louis Hoym de Marien, and completed in 1973. Many claim the 209-metre tower appears out of context on the central Paris skyline, where it is dwarfed only by the 324-metre Eiffel Tower. (Source: Dezeen)

Tour Montparnasse, Paris (Photo Credit: Dezeen)

Tour Montparnasse, Paris (Photo Credit: Dezeen)

5 designers imagine White House interiors for Clinton and Trump: Each time a new president moves into the White House, the décor also undergoes a regime change, as the incoming First Family puts its personal stamp on the best-known residence in the United States. Jacqueline Kennedy enlisted Dorothy Mae ‘Sister’ Parish to redo the family quarters, while Nancy Reagan worked with her friend, California designer Ted Graber to give the executive mansion a bit of her over-the-top Hollywood style.

Come January 2017, a new First Family will occupy 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue – with that in mind, Wallpaper* asked five designers to imagine taking on the project of redecorating both a Hillary Clinton and a Donald Trump White House, based on the candidates’ sensibilities. Proposing styles from chic and understated to mirrored and opulent, David Netto, Betsy Burnham, Robert Couturier, Alexandra Loew and Brian J McCarthy reveal how they would decorate the White House for both candidates. (Source: Wallpaper*)

Hillary Clinton’s Lincoln Bedroom proposal by Brian J McCarthy (Photo Credit: Brian J McCarthy/Wallpaper*)

Hillary Clinton’s Lincoln Bedroom proposal by Brian J McCarthy (Photo Credit: Brian J McCarthy/Wallpaper*)

An updated Uffizi is unveiled:If awards were given out among Italy’s art-rich museums, the Uffizi Gallery in Florence would certainly vie for the greatest-hits prize, with such an abundant collection of Renaissance artworks that visitors often bypass seminal paintings in their rush to gawk at people pleasers like Botticelli’s “Spring” or “Birth of Venus”.That is expected to change with a reorganization of several rooms allocated to Early Renaissance art that opened on Monday. The new layout drastically modifies how the museum’s sizable collection of Botticelli paintings and works by Pollaiolo, Hugo van der Goes, Rogier van der Weyden and Domenico Ghirlandaio are exhibited, giving all the works sufficient space to shine.

Officials hope the reorganization will dissipate congestion in front of Botticelli’s heaviest hitters and offer a better view — and understanding — of individual artworks. Botticelli’s that jostled for attention in the old exhibition space — which hadn’t been modified since 1978 — have now been hung widely apart. (Source: The New York Times)

Boticelli’s ‘Spring’ at the newly renovated Uffizi Gallery in Florence (Photo Credit: Alberto Pizzoli/Agence France-Presse, Getty Images)

Boticelli’s ‘Spring’ at the newly renovated Uffizi Gallery in Florence (Photo Credit: Alberto Pizzoli/Agence France-Presse, Getty Images)

New York’s future second-tallest skyscraper breaks ground:Construction has begun on the One Vanderbilt tower in Midtown Manhattan, which will overtake 432 Park Avenue as the second-tallest structure in New York City. The ground-breaking ceremony to mark the beginning of the tower’s construction took place on Tuesday morning at the site beside Grand Central Station. At 1,501 feet, it will surpass the height of Rafael Vińoly‘s skinny residential skyscraper 432 Park Avenue but remain short of One World Trade Center‘s 1,776 feet. An entire city block was demolished to make way for the glass-sheathed skyscraper, which was designed by international architecture firm Kohn Pedersen Fox. (Source: Dezeen)

Rendered image of One Vanderbilt by Kohn Pedersen Fox (Image Credit: Kohn Pedersen Fox)

Rendered image of One Vanderbilt by Kohn Pedersen Fox (Image Credit: Kohn Pedersen Fox)

Stone specialist Salvatori opens a Central London showroom: Keeping things interesting in the field of stone surfaces is what Italian company Salvatori does best – and its latest opening on London’s Wigmore Street is proof of that. Best known for its innovative transformations of natural stone, the brand offers a wide portfolio of marbles and textured rock, and has applied its skills to bathroom essentials such as sinks and tubs.

Upon entering, visitors are immersed in the Salvatori universe, walking through theatrical wings clad in stone and marble that offer panoramas of a number of the company’s bathroom collections.Upstairs, collections that push the limits of the brand’s materials, such as Ron Gilad‘s limited edition ‘Girella’, are on display.The store was created in a collaboration with architect Piero Lissoni and interior stylist Elisa Ossino. For the occasion, Salvatori created a small celebratory collection. (Source: Wallpaper*)

Salvatori’s new showroom in London, by PieroLissoni and Elisa Ossino (Photo Credit: Salvatori/Wallpaper*)

Salvatori’s new showroom in London, by Piero Lissoni and Elisa Ossino (Photo Credit: Salvatori/Wallpaper*)

Gwen Stefani and Gavin Rossdale are selling their home for $35 million:After finalising their divorce in April this year, Gwen Stefani and Gavin Rossdale have listed the Beverly Hills, California home they shared for $35M, according to Variety. The massive home spans 11,845 sq. ft., features 7 bedrooms and 7.5 baths, and boasts sweeping views of the San Fernando Valley. Maximalist decorator Kelly Wearstler designed the over-the-top interiors to match Stefani’s bold personality, incorporating black-and-white-striped walls and hot-pink furniture.

The interiors also include marble floors and several marble fireplaces. The property also boasts a guesthouse, an infinity pool, a gym, a children’s playground, and even a chicken coop. Stefani and Rossdale aren’t its first inhabitants, thought – Jennifer Lopez lived in the mansion from 2000 until 2004. (Source: Architectural Digest)

One of the 7 bedrooms in Gwen Stefani and Gavin Rossdale’s Beverly Hills mansion (Photo Credit: Westside Estate Agency)

One of the 7 bedrooms in Gwen Stefani and Gavin Rossdale’s Beverly Hills mansion (Photo Credit: Westside Estate Agency)

 

  • Dan Turner

    I absolutely love your content. Keep it coming, please!

    October 24, 2016 at 8:01 am Reply

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