Zaha Hadid Exhibition plus more architecture and design news
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THE LATEST NEWS FROM THE ART & DESIGN WORLD

A WEEKLY CURATED SELECTION OF NEWS FROM ARCHITECTS, DESIGNERS & ARTISTS WORLDWIDE:

Every week, we collate information from press releases and articles across the worldwide web in order to give you a curated selection of hot news from the wonderful world of art, design and architecture. Scroll down and find out more about what’s been happening this week.

‘ZHA UNBUILT’ EXHIBITION AT ZAHA HADID DESIGN GALLERY:

ZHA Unbuilt – a series of exhibitions featuring a selection of unrealised designs demonstrating Zaha Hadid Architects’ on-going design investigation explores ZHA’s recent design concepts which derive from the innovation and research that are the foundations of the firm’s architectural works currently in development.
ZHA Unbuilt opened on 25th May and will continue until 18th August this year. (Read more at: Zaha Hadid Architects)

'ZHA Unbuilt' exhibition at Zaha Hadid Design Gallery

Image Courtesy: Zaha Hadid Architects

GAUDI’S FIRST BUILT HOUSE SET TO OPEN TO PUBLIC FOR FIRST TIME:

The first house completed by Spanish architect Antoni Gaudí will open to the public this autumn, following a major restoration.

Featuring colourful tiles and ornate details, Casa Vicens was built by Gaudí between 1883 and 1885, as a summer home for real-estate broker Manel Vicens i Montaner.

Not only was it the first house built by the Catalan modernist, it was also his first completed building in Barcelona, where he went on to create masterpieces including Casa BatllóPark Güell and the still yet-to-complete Sagrada Família. (Find out more at: dezeen)

Gaudí's first built house set to open to public for first time

Image Courtesy: dezeen

INSIDE AVENUE ROAD’S NEW FURNITURE CONCEPT SPACE:

Situated above the brand’s New York showroom in Manhattan’s Flower District, it’s a concept space that feels and functions like a home — outfitted with objects from Avenue Road’s portfolio so visitors can see them in action.
In addition to hosting events and installations, the by-appointment-only space provides a more personal, private mode of engaging with the objects on view, inspiring ideas for how to make them your own. (Read full story at: Wallpaper*)

Two sofas feature in the generous salon, one by Christophe Delcourt, and the other by Yabu Pushelberg

Image Courtesy: Wallpaper*

DUTCH FIRM CONCRETE COMPLETES TALLEST RESIDENTIAL SKYSCRAPER IN NEW JERSEY:

Amsterdam-based studio Concrete has completed an apartment tower across from Manhattan that features a range of unusual amenities, including a “creative lab”, and a residency program for scientists and artists.

Called Jersey City Urby, the 69-storey skyscraper is located at 200 Greene Street in Jersey City, just across the Hudson River from Lower Manhattan. Rising 713 feet, the skyscraper is the tallest residential building in New Jersey, but falls shy of the state’s overall tallest structure: the 781-foot-tall, 30 Hudson Street office tower. (Find out more at: dezeen)

Dutch firm Concrete completes tallest residential skyscraper in New Jersey

Image Courtesy: Ewout Huibers

AN OLD UPHOLSTERY FACTORY GETS A FRESH COAT OF BLUE PAINT:

When interior designer Mark Lewis was invited to fully renovate an empty 2,000-square-foot space in an old London upholstery factory, the brief was to create a luxury two-bedroom apartment that retained its authentic industrial features. Timber flooring installed in the 1980s had been laid over bitumen, a kind of asphalt.

Stripping it all back revealed original Victorian floorboards, which were painstakingly salvaged and re-laid on the surface. The concrete and steel-paneled ceiling adds a distinctly raw aesthetic overhead. (Read more at: Architectural Digest)

The factory’s concrete ceiling was sandblasted to remove years of paint and reveal the steel joists. The imprint of timbers used in the construction of the ceiling adds to its textural quality, and an open-plan layout and internal windows ensure it can be enjoyed throughout the home. The floating shelves were created from old joists found under the flooring; they also zone the apartment without blocking the flow of light.

Image Courtesy: Rory Gardiner

‘MIDTOWN’ IS A CONTENTIOUS MIX OF ART, DESIGN, CRAFT AND VARIOUS HYBRIDS:

It’s worth visiting this show just to experience the space of Lever House, which became a landmark in 1982; even under these stark conditions, you can sense the intimacy and human scale that informed early skyscraper design. But the show itself is provocative, throwing out questions on all sides, even if it answers few of them.

Mainly it exposes the growing, often dubious, grey area of pricey, often one-off objects that are more interesting to look at than to use but may not be visually adamant enough to be art. You decide. (Read full story at: The New York Times)

That Chair’s Charming, but Can I Sit in It? - “Midtown,” an exhibition at Lever House on Park Avenue, is a contentious mix of art, design, craft and various hybrids. Above left, Gaetano Pesce’s “Cloud Lamp” and, right, his “Sandbag Chair.”

Image Courtesy: Michael Nagle

STOCKHOLM MAY DESIGN AN INFINITY POOL ALONG THE BALTIC SEA:

Highways—however useful and necessary they are in transporting cars in and around urban cities—are generally unattractive. It’s even more of an aesthetic concern if the highway occupies a space with some of the most dramatic views in and around the area.

That’s what led the award-winning Stockholm-based firm Ulf Mejergren Architects (UMA) to reimagine a 0.62-mile stretch of highway that runs through the heart of Stockholm. They are proposing to do so in an unconventional way: by designing an infinity pool above the stretch of road. (Find out more at: Architectural Digest)

The proposed infinity pool would cover the crowded Route 222, while providing guests views of the Baltic Sea and Stockholm's Old Town.

Image Courtesy: Ulf Mejergren Architects

MVRDV TRANSFORMS 1970S HIGHWAY INTO ‘PLANT VILLAGE’ IN SEOUL:

Dutch studio MVRDV has converted a former overpass into a plant-covered walkway in Seoul, which follows a kilometre-long route above the traffic.

The walkway, called Seoullo 7017, is part of a wider project to made the city more pedestrian friendly. Its name translates as Seoul Street, and fuses together the years of its original construction with the renovation works. (Read more at: dezeen)

MVRDV transforms 1970s highway into 'plant village' in Seoul

Image Courtesy: dezeen

YOUNG ARTISTS TEST THE LIMITS OF PHOTOGRAPHY AT FOAM TALENT’S LONDON SHOW:

What form can a photograph take in 2017? Don’t expect just pictures on walls.

‘Every year we are again very curious to see how young talents are experimenting with photography on the very edges of the medium,’ says Foam Talent curator Mirjam Kooiman.

Now, Foam Talent has arrived in London to show us photographs not as we know them: camera-less pictures, 3D objects, installations, wallpapers, lightboxes, beamers and projections are among just some of the formats on show at their showcase of 24 artists at Beaconsfield Gallery in Vauxhall. (Find out more at: Wallpaper*)

Zaha Hadid Exhibition plus more architecture and design news

Image Courtesy: Wallpaper*

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