News from the Art Architecture and Design World
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THE LATEST NEWS FROM THE ART & DESIGN WORLD

A WEEKLY CURATED SELECTION OF NEWS FROM ARCHITECTS, DESIGNERS & ARTISTS WORLDWIDE:

Every week, we collate information from press releases and articles across the worldwide web in order to give you a curated selection of hot news from the wonderful world of art, design and architecture. Scroll down and find out more about what’s been happening this week.

PENDA DESIGNS MODULAR WOODEN “VILLAGE” FOR BEIJING HORTICULTURAL EXPO:

Architecture studio Penda has revealed plans to create a vast network of modular building blocks at the International Horticultural Expo 2019 in Beijing, forming a 30,000-square-metre exhibition space. Penda architects Chris Precht and Dayong Sun plan to build on their experience with modular construction to create the exhibition space for Chinese property developer Vanke.

Their aim is to create an alternative to the traditional expo pavilion – typically an iconic piece of architecture, where visitors often have to queue to get inside. They instead want both the insides and outsides of their structure to be an exhibit. (Read the full story: Dezeen)

Image Courtesy: Penda

IN DOWNTOWN MIAMI, RAFAEL VIÑOLY’S LATEST LUXURY DEVELOPMENT IS ON POINT:

Striking a power pose at the Miami River basin, Rafael Viñoly’s luxury residential project One River Point is leading the way for major development in Downtown Miami. With sales launching this January, the building is set to break ground in late 2017.

Featuring two symmetrical towers connected by the Sky Bridge and landscaped riverside park surroundings set across 1.8 acres, the building will be a welcome addition to the Miami River area, which is currently undergoing a regeneration process. Its most striking design feature, the Sky Bridge, suspended at 800ft above the Miami River, will hold a 35,000-sq-ft private club run by Adrian Zecha, the Indonesian hotelier behind Aman Resorts. (Read the full story: Wallpaper*)

Image Courtesy: Rafael Viñoly

SECOND OLD MASTER PAINTING A FAKE, SOTHEBY’S SAYS IN LAWSUIT:

A painting attributed to the circle of the 16th-century Italian artist known as Parmigianino has been determined to be a modern fake, according to a complaint filed by Sotheby’s auction house in the United States District Court in New York on Tuesday. The company filed the complaint against collector Lionel de Saint Donat-Pourrières, who consigned the painting to Sotheby’s for a 2012 auction, where it sold to another collector for $842,500.

Through testing of paint samples taken from the oil painting, the auction house says, it has determined that the portrait of “St. Jerome” contains pigments throughout the paint layer that were not invented until the 20th century. This is the second painting that has been deemed a fake in what may be a widening old masters’ forgery case that could go back several years. (Read the full story: New York Times)

“St. Jerome”, attributed to the circle of the 16th century Italian artist Parmigianino (Image Courtesy: Sotheby’s)

SEE INSIDE ZAHA HADID’S MAGIC MARBLE FACTORY:

One might not always associate an established marble-design company based in Verona, Italy, with industry-leading innovation. For Citco, however, pushing the envelope of cutting-edge masonry is exactly what’s responsible for its success: strong relationships with design pioneers such as Zaha Hadid, Norman Foster, and Arik Levy.

Hadid, who died last March, was famous for morphing unexpected materials into galactic forms—alternately monumental and small—that defy imagination. Architectural Digest had a look behind the scenes at the company’s Verona headquarters, where the distinctive manufacturing process relies on six-axis engraving machines, water-jet cutting equipment, and the expert craftsmanship of its in-house artisans. (Read the full article: Architectural Digest)

A white Carrara marble “Valle” collection platter designed by Zaha Hadid (Image Courtesy: Citco)

 BIG’S VIA 57 WEST SKYSCRAPER CAPTURED AT SUNSET BY HUFTON + CROW:

British duo Hufton + Crow have become the latest photographers to shoot BIG‘s first contribution to the Manhattan skyline, capturing the building’s dramatic silhouette from across the Hudson River. BIG founder, Danish architect Bjarke Ingels, described the 709-unit building as a “court-scraper” as it is arranged around a central courtyard – a feature also shown in the images.

The building includes 940,000 square feet of floor space and takes up a full city block, on the edge of the busy West Side Highway. Hufton + Crow also got up close to the tower to reveal its other, zig-zagging outer facades, which comprise a pixel-like pattern of windows. (Read the full story: Dezeen)

Image Courtesy: Hufton + Crow

NEW TRICKS – LONDON’S DESIGN MUSEUM TACKLES DESIGN FOR AN AGEING POPULATION:

The world is ageing ungracefully. Our population is the oldest it’s ever been, with over 500,000 in the UK aged 90 or older. Half of people over the age of 75 live alone. A new exhibition at London’s Design Museum demonstrates design’s potential to help us lead healthier, more rewarding lives as we age.

Commissions from leading designers (among them Yves Béhar, Konstantin Grcic and Priestman Goode), offer solutions within the framework of ageing, identity, home, community, working and mobility. This format draws from the 1980s exhibition ‘New Design for Old‘ at the Boilerhouse Project at the V&A, curated by Lady Helen Hamlyn. (Read the full story: Wallpaper*)

Head in the Sky, by Konstantin Grcic, 2016 (Image Courtesy: London Design Museum)

IS THIS LOS ANGELES’ SIX HUNDRED MILLION DOLLAR MAN:

Michael Govan, the director of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, has a provocative vision for his museum and his adopted city. The New York Times’ Adam Nagourney met with Mr Govan as he oversaw the installation of an exhibition of paintings by Agnes Martin, to discuss future plans for the museum.

According to the LACMA’s visionary director, Los Angeles stands out today as a city where art is being made — as artists flock here to take advantage of the light and the space — rather than a place where it is being shared with the public. (Read the full story: New York Times)

A rendering of the new design for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The freestanding smoky-gray building by Peter Zumthor spans Wilshire Boulevard. An existing building by Renzo Piano is to the west (Image Courtesy: Peter Zumthor & Partner)

SNØHETTA ADDS TREETOP CABIN WITH STARGAZING NET TO SWEDEN’S TREEHOTEL:

Snøhetta has completed a treetop cabin for the Treehotel in northern Sweden, featuring charred-timber cladding and a suspended net for observing the Northern Lights. Set 10 metres above the forest floor in the crown of a tall pine tree and supported by 12 columns, the 7th Room provides views out over Swedish Lapland, the Lule River and the aurora borealis.

Contrasting the dark charred exterior, the cabin’s interior features birch plywood walls and ash wood floors, complemented by light-toned furniture. Treehotel was set up by Kent Lindvall and his wife Britta in 2010 for tourists visiting the Arctic Circle in search of the Northern Lights. (Read the full story: Dezeen)

The 7th Room, Treehotel, by Snøhetta (Image Courtesy: Snøhetta)

MUSEUM TRUSTEE, A TRUMP DONOR, SUPPORTS GROUPS THAT DENY CLIMATE CHANGE:

One of the Manhattan-based American Museum of Natural History’s leaders, a trustee who is also an important donor to the institution, Rebekah Mercer, has been using her family’s millions to fund organisations that question climate change, a cornerstone of the conservative agenda she is advancing as an influential member of President-elect Donald J. Trump’s transition team.

The connection of Ms. Mercer, the museum and the Mercer Family Foundation’s donation history came to light during an analysis by The New York Times of activities by cultural leaders who donated to Mr. Trump’s presidential campaign. Several of them are board members at New York City arts organizations, including John Paulson at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Mercedes T. Bass at the Metropolitan Opera. But none are as unusual a fit as Ms. Mercer and the American Museum of Natural History. (Read the full story: New York Times)

Rebekah Mercer, left, and her parents Robert and Diana Mercer. (Image Credit: Sylvain Gaboury/Patrick McMullan, via Getty Images)

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